Partagez
Voir le sujet précédentAller en basVoir le sujet suivant
avatar
kimberly
Eau Bénite
Eau Bénite
Féminin
Age : 29
Messages : 84
Frère Préféré : Sam Winchester
Inscription : 09/05/2008

New interview with Eric Kripke

le Sam 10 Mai - 17:52
Creative Screenwriting Interview with Eric Kripke
Finding Your Inner Demons:
Supernatural's Eric Kripke
By Jason Davis



Eric Kripke takes CS Weekly behind the scenes of his CW series Supernatural and explains how an affinity for urban legends and some sound advice during development led to a show closing out its third successful season on the air.

Supernatural chronicles the exploits of brothers Dean (Jensen Ackles) and Sam Winchester (Jared Padalecki) as they follow in the demon-hunting footsteps of their father John (Jeffrey Dean Morgan), who declared war on everything from ghosts to vampires when his wife was killed by an evil entity years before. While finishing up the show's strike-shortened third season, creator Eric Kripke took time away from the forces of darkness to tell CS Weekly how the series came to be.

How did you end up creating Supernatural for the WB?
I had adapted another show for the WB, a piece of crap called Tarzan. Here're my feelings on Tarzan: I'll stand behind the pilot. It has a beginning, middle, and -- the problem -- it ends. I was hungry to have anything in production, so I wrote a 50-page story that ended. Then it got made and I had something in production and it was all my dreams come true. They said to me, "Let's do 12 more." I said, "Uh, wait! What's the story?" So, Tarzan was a hell ride in every way, and we only did eight before they wisely put us out of our misery. But I think Warner Bros. appreciated that I stood proudly on the deck of the Titanic with my violin and just played away. I never tried to dress as a woman and get off the boat… I just went right down with that ship. So they came to me the next year and said, "Thank you for developing Tarzan for us, but what idea do you want to do?"

I had in my back pocket an idea that was basically an exploration of American urban legends, an obsession of mine since back in elementary school. The pitch I took to them was a reporter who would go out and investigate these urban legends. They were all true, but no one ever believed them -- basically a sub-par rip-off of Night Stalker. Warner Bros., to their credit, said, "We don't want to do the reporter idea. What else you got?" The reporter idea was all I had. I'd been working on it for weeks and it was very fleshed out and had its own mythology. I immediately started lying through my teeth and saying, "I do have another version of this idea where it's Route 66… and it's these two guys on a road trip… and they're brothers! They investigate these urban legends as they drive from town to town in a muscle car." Warner Bros. sparked to that immediately. We took it to the WB and they bought it.

You mentioned on one of the DVD commentaries that your original pilot was substantially different from what got produced. What changed?
The single biggest change, although it ends up being the core of the show, was that in my original version, Sam and Dean were not raised with their father. Their father disappeared when they were kids and they were raised by this aunt and uncle. Dean went out to find his father and then came back to collect Sam two years later, saying, "I found out what Dad's really been up to." The idea was to bring Sam in as a civilian from the outside world who didn't believe in the supernatural. Then suddenly he was exposed to this insane world… and dad also died in the teaser.

I was too precious with [the script]. I cared so much about every little detail and filling every hole that it ended up being way too much exposition. It didn't have the same kind of loose freewheeling sense of humor the series ended up having. It was very, very serious. I must have spent three months writing it, turned it in, and the studio threw it out. They said, "We're not crazy about it." I heard, "We're wiping our butt with it." I said, "Let me find a way to simplify the back story." So, [producer Peter Johnson and I] said, "What if the boys grew up with Dad so they don't need any of this stuff explained to them?" All of a sudden, a two-page exposition scene just becomes a couplet of dialogue. They have this funhouse mirror of an American childhood where they're trying to balance their schoolwork with slaughtering creatures. It brought everything to life. The other thing about it that we didn't count on is they basically grew up as exterminators -- so they had this really humorous, blue-collar, unimpressed view of the supernatural. That's something you never or rarely see, even in shows I adore like X-Files. You know there are aliens and you have to take time for that appropriate sense of awe and wonder. But on Supernatural, if they see a ghost, they shoot it with a gun. I love that dead-pan reaction to these unbelievable and extraordinary events.

I guess in retooling the pilot you also created the ongoing storyline…
…of finding Dad. I have to give [Warner Bros. President] Peter Roth credit for that, too. I spent three months on the first version. I spent probably three weeks on the second version. And the second version's better 'cause I had more fun with it. The way this version ended is Sam went back to his apartment to find his dead father. It was Peter Roth who said, "Please keep the father alive. It provides a place for them to go and a certain amount of hope for the boys. It's not so nihilistic." That was the right decision, because it ended up providing us a really strong season one mythology. Still, of the three years of Supernatural, my favorite season is season one, because it's so simple and so emotional. You can tell the whole season-wide story in two words: find Dad. We've never come up with a mythology as pure and elegant and emotional as that one.

But someone had to die. The studio and network were giving me all these notes about Sam's girlfriend, [Jessica, played by Adrianne Palicki], who survived originally. Can she make phone calls with the boys? How's their relationship going to develop? Are they meant for each other? I was horrified by the idea of telling a relationship b-story while you're trying to avert Armageddon in the A-story, so I went back to them and said, "Good news! I've figured out exactly how we're going to develop the girlfriend's story." They said, "How?" I said, "I'm going to burst her into flames on the ceiling." The reality is, Luke Skywalker ain't going off to save the universe until his aunt and uncle are crispy. So if we couldn't kill Dad -- which would have certainly motivated Sam in terms of revenge -- we had to shut off the possibility of a normal life, which the death of Jessica did. There was no choice but to go off with Dean to find this demon and try to get some revenge.

How do you break a Supernatural story?
In season one, we had a greatest hits of urban legends -- Hook Man and Bloody Mary -- so the first thing we decided was the monster. Then, the story developed around it. Because of that, the structures of the season one episodes were actually quite similar, to the point of becoming boring and repetitive. The guys rolled into town, they met the girl, they went to the library, they fought the monster, they kissed the girl, and off they went. Just plug in different monsters each time.

Once we got into season two, [executive producer] Bob Singer and I realized if we continued down that path, we'd be dead. We stumbled onto a more effective way of breaking these stories. The first thing we determine is, what structure haven't we seen before? Is it Dog Day Afternoon? Is it Groundhog Day? Is it Memento? What's a way to keep our structure changed up so we rarely repeat ourselves? Two, what storyline will put the boys under the most emotional duress? Putting the boys in mortal danger doesn't really seem to be all that effective. You know they're going to survive. But putting them in emotional danger really works because you can just torture the hell out of them and the question becomes can they be saved before they're emotionally screwed to hell? That actually has some stakes to it. Once we figure out what their internal demons are we say, "What creature is the perfect metaphor for that?" The episodes have improved as a result.

How does an episode like "Hell House," with such a unique monster, come into being?
That was a writer who wrote a freelance for us, Trey Callaway. He told an anecdote that we thought would be a great episode for Supernatural. He and his buddies found an abandoned barn and they painted the inside of it with red paint and chains. Then, they went home and told everybody how they stumbled onto this barn and that the ghost of a serial killer resided there. So, kids would start going and checking this place out… and then the rumor just spread until it became a town legend. People started reporting seeing the spirit, and then some girl saw the spirit and ran so fast and scared that she fell and broke her leg. And this whole time, this group of boys made it up and it's taking on a life of its own. The idea that we sparked to is a story of urban legends themselves and how they spread. So it's about how these things take on a life of their own and they become these self-fulfilling prophecies. [The story] became about these people who invented this urban legend and then [it] literally came to life from the fact that people believed in it. The last step was, what piece of real-life legend out there would support this idea? Trey researched and said "Tulpas -- things that come to life when people think about them." Plug that in and that's a good example of how something develops, usually monster last, these days.

And you don't seem to be afraid of a little of philosophizing here and there -- the religious-themed episodes "Faith" and "Houses of the Holy" spring to mind…
You're playing in the realm of life, death, fate, destiny, good, evil, and so it seems inevitable to tell those kinds of stories and do a bit of philosophizing. I'm actually more comfortable hiding those things in a bit of metaphor. One of my favorite philosophical episodes is "Bloodlust." They meet this hunter, Gordon (Sterling K. Brown), who's this vampire killer. If you substitute any minority of your choice for the word "vampire" in the episode, it actually becomes a fairly subversive investigation of racism. Gordon is a human supremacist and feels the only good member of this particular minority, vampire, is a dead one. Why I love this genre is 'cause you can say subversive things and just hide it in metaphor. Dean gives a speech at the end of this episode saying to Sam, "Dad raised us to be racists. I didn't want to be, but I can't help it because I hate them so much." To have your main character basically cop to racism is something you just don't see much on the CW. You just bury it in genre and the people who get the message are really paying attention.

Jason Davis has been the DVD Manager for CS Weekly, a contributing editor for Creative Screenwriting Magazine, and has written for Cinescape.com, MSN.com, and created the TV series Studio 13, which ran on Lorne Michaels' Burly TV network. He lives in the small space left over by his ever-expanding library of books, movies, and music.

thanx for: http://www.freeforums.in/phpbb/viewtopic.php?p=35071&mforum=supernatural#35071
avatar
Samoht
Bitch
Bitch
Masculin
Age : 30
Prénom : Thomas
Messages : 25192
Frère Préféré : Sam
Inscription : 17/05/2007
http://www.delafarineetdesoeufs.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 12:40
Merci Kimberly! Je tenterai de faire une traduction assez rapidement
avatar
Calypso
Born to be WL's Sadist
Féminin
Age : 41
Prénom : Caly Gyllenhaalic & ECHELON n°1
Messages : 39700
Frère Préféré : Sammy and an expresso, what else !!!!
Inscription : 09/02/2008
http://www.jaredheart.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 17:42
Merci Kimberly pour l'article .
On apprend pas mal de choses concernant notre série fétiche
Entre autre qu'elle aurait dû être légèrement différente à la base
J'aurai bien aimer voir ce qu'elle aurait pû donner tel qu'Eric Kripke l'avait imaginé
avatar
Dexterine
Épée du Purgatoire
Épée du Purgatoire
Féminin
Age : 32
Messages : 1014
Frère Préféré : vous pouvez répéter la question?
Inscription : 11/05/2008

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 17:57
Samoht a écrit:Merci Kimberly! Je tenterai de faire une traduction assez rapidement
crie si t'as besoin d'aide...
avatar
Samoht
Bitch
Bitch
Masculin
Age : 30
Prénom : Thomas
Messages : 25192
Frère Préféré : Sam
Inscription : 17/05/2007
http://www.delafarineetdesoeufs.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 18:07
C'est bon à savoir ^^

*pense à créer une équipe de traducteurs*
avatar
Calypso
Born to be WL's Sadist
Féminin
Age : 41
Prénom : Caly Gyllenhaalic & ECHELON n°1
Messages : 39700
Frère Préféré : Sammy and an expresso, what else !!!!
Inscription : 09/02/2008
http://www.jaredheart.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 21:24
Si t'as besoin, d'une traductrice en plus, n'hésites pas à me dire aussi.
Je peux t'aider aussi si tu veux


*pars se cacher, aurais dû se proposer plus tôt*
avatar
Samoht
Bitch
Bitch
Masculin
Age : 30
Prénom : Thomas
Messages : 25192
Frère Préféré : Sam
Inscription : 17/05/2007
http://www.delafarineetdesoeufs.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 11 Mai - 22:06
Tu fais bien de me le dire, je monte un groupe de traducteurs alors si tu veux en être... envoie-moi un MP!
avatar
Elodie
Eau Bénite
Eau Bénite
Féminin
Age : 39
Prénom : Elodie
Messages : 81
Frère Préféré : Sam
Inscription : 13/05/2008

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Mer 14 Mai - 17:34
Merci pour cette interview.J'aime bien aussi sa première idée de scénario.
avatar
Dexterine
Épée du Purgatoire
Épée du Purgatoire
Féminin
Age : 32
Messages : 1014
Frère Préféré : vous pouvez répéter la question?
Inscription : 11/05/2008

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 1 Juin - 16:29
2 ans plus tard... Voici la traduction de cette interview qui relate la naissance de Supernatural et la construction des épisodes.

(Trad par Calypso et Dexterine)

Entretien avec le créateur et scénariste Kripke.


Trouvez vos demons intérieurs:
Le surnaturel d’Eric Kripke,
Par Jason Davis


Eric Kripke à emmené CSWeekly dans les coulisses de sa série Supernatural sur CW et explique comment un attrait pour les légendes urbaines et quelques bons conseils pendant le développement ont conduit à une série qui termine avec succès sa troisième saison à l’antenne.

Supernatural relate les exploits des frères Dean et Sam Winchester alors qu’ils suivent les traces de leur chasseur de démon de père qui à déclaré la guerre à tout, depuis les fantômes jusqu’aux vampires, quand sa femme à été assassinée par une entité démoniaque plusieurs années auparavant.
En finissant la saison 3, écourtée par la grève des scénaristes, le créateur Eric Kripke à pris un peu de temps hors des forces de l’ombre pour raconter à CS Weekly comment la série est née.

Comment en êtes vous arrivé à créer Supernatural pour la WB ?

J’avais adapté une autre série pour WB, une merde appelée Tarzan.
Mon sentiment à propos de Tarzan était : « je m’en tiens au pilote ». Ca à un début, un milieu et… - le problème – la fin. J’avais faim de production, donc j’écrivais une histoire de 50 pages avec une fin. Ensuite ça a été fait et j’avais quelque chose en production et tout mes rêves devenaient réalité. Ils m’ont dit, « Faisons-en 12 de plus. » J’ai dis « Heu… attendez ! C’est quoi l’histoire ? » Donc, Tarzan était un enfer dans tous les sens du terme et on en a fait 8 avant qu’ils nous sortent intelligemment de notre détresse. Mais je pense que WB à apprécié que je sois resté fièrement sur le pont du Titanic avec mon violon et que j’ai continué de jouer. Je n’ai jamais essayé de me déguiser en femme et de quitter le navire. J’ai juste coulé avec lui. Alors ils sont venus vers moi l’année d’après et dit « Merci d’avoir développé Tarzan pour nous, mais quelle idée voulez vous faire ? »

J’avais une idée derrière la tête qui était essentiellement une exploration des légendes urbaines Américaines, l’une de mes obsessions depuis l’école primaire.
Le pitch que je leur ai proposé comprenait un reporter qui sortait pour enquêter sur ces légendes urbaines. Elles étaient toutes vraies, mais personne ne les croyait jamais. C’était en fait une pale copie de Night Stalker.

WB, à leur crédit, à dit « On ne veut pas de l’idée du reporter. Vous avez quoi d’autre ? » L’idée du reporter était tout ce que j’avais. Je travaillais dessus depuis des semaines, ça prenait de plus en plus corps et avait sa propre mythologie. J’ai tout de suite commencer à mentir entre mes dents en disant « J’ai une autre version de cette idée plutôt Route 66… et il y a ces deux gars dans un roadtrip… et ils sont frères ! Ils enquêtent sur les légendes urbaines en conduisant de ville en ville dans leur grosse bagnole.
WB s’est illuminé à cette idée. On leur à apporté et ils ont acheté.


Sur les commentaires du DVD, vous disiez que votre pilote original était substantiellement différent de ce qui à été produit. Qu’est ce qui a changé ?

Le vrai gros changement, même si ça à fini par devenir l’essence même de la série, était que dans ma version originale, Sam et Dean n’étaient pas élevés par leur père. Le père avait disparu quand ils étaient gamins et ils avaient été élevés par une tante et un oncle. Dean était parti à la recherche de son père et ensuite revenu pour retrouver son frère, deux années plus tard en disant « J’ai découvert ce que papa faisait vraiment. ». L’idée était d’amener Sam comme un civil du monde extérieur qui ne croit pas au surnaturel. Et tout à coup il est exposé à ce monde complètement fou… et le père mourrait aussi dans le teaser.

J’étais trop précis avec le script. Je tenais tellement à chaque petit détail et à remplir chaque trou que ça à fini par ressembler beaucoup trop à une longue explication. Ca n’avait pas le même genre de sens de l’humour en roue libre que la série à fini par avoir. C’était très, très sérieux. J’ai dû passer sept mois à l’écrire, à le changer, et le studio l’a foutu à la poubelle.
Ils ont dit « On est pas emballés ». J’ai entendu « On se torche le cul avec ça. ». J’ai dis « Laissez-moi simplifier l’histoire de fond. » .
Alors, le producteur Peter Johnson et moi avons dit « Et si les garçons avaient grandis avec leur père, ils n’ont pas besoin qu’on leur explique toutes ces choses ? ». Tout à coup, une scène d’explication de 2 pages est devenue un dialogue de deux lignes.

Ils avaient ce miroir déformant d’une enfance américaine où ils essaient d’équilibrer leurs devoirs et le meurtre de créatures. Ca à donné vie à l’ensemble.
L’autre chose qu’on avait pas prévue c’est qu’ils ont donc grandi en tant qu’exterminateurs – donc ils ont vraiment cette vue humoristique, ouvrière, du surnaturel. C’est quelque chose qu’on ne voit jamais ou rarement, même dans les séries que j’adore comme X-files. Vous savez qu’il y a des aliens mais vous avez besoin de temps pour avoir ce sens du questionnement et de la connaissance.
Mais dans Supernatural, si ils voient un fantôme, ils lui tirent dessus avec un fligue. J’adore cette réaction impassible à ces choses incroyables et extra ordinaires.

J’imagine qu’en réarrangeant le pilote vous avez également créé un nouveau plot…

…sur le fait de retrouver le père. Le crédit en revient à Peter Roth, président de WB. J’ai passé trois mois sur la première version. J’ai surement passé 3 semaines sur la seconde. Et la seconde est meilleure car je me suis plus amusé à la faire. Cette version finissait avec Sam qui rentre à son appartement pour trouver son père mort. C’est Peter Roth qui à dit « Je t’en prie, garde le père en vie. » Ca constitue un endrit à explorer pour eux et un peu d’espoir. Ce n’est pas nihiliste. C’était la bonne décision, parce qu’au final ça nous à donné une mythologie pour la saison 1 vraiment forte.
Encore aujourd’hui sur les trois ans de supernatural, la saison 1 reste ma préférée, parce qu’elle est si simple et émotionnelle. Vous pouvez raconter l’étendue de la saison en deux mots : Trouver papa. On a jamais retrouvé une mythologie aussi pure et élégante que celle ci.

Mais quelqu’un devait mourir. Le studio et le network me laissaient toutes ces notes à propos de la copine de Sam, Jess, qui survivait à la base. Pouvait elle téléphoner aux garçons ? Comment leur relation allait elle se developper ? Sont ils fait l’un pour l’autre? J’étais terrifié à l’idée de raconteur une relation comme histoire B pendant que vous essayez d’empêcher l’Armageddon dans l’histoire A, alors j’y suis retourné et j’ai dis « Bonne nouvelle ! Je sais exactement comment on va developper l’histoire de la petite copine ! ». Ils ont dit « Comment ? », j’ai dit « Je vais la cramer au plafond. ». La vérité c’est que Luke skywalker ne part pas sauver l’univers avant que sont oncle et sa tante ne soient rotis. Dons si on ne pouvait pas tuer papa, ce qui aurait certainement motivé Sam en termes de vengeance, on devait fermer la possibilité d’une vie normale, ce qu’a fait la mort de Jess.
Il n’y avait plus d’autre choix que de partir avec Dean pour trouver le démon et essayer d’obtenir vengeance


Comment est ce que vous arrivez à une histoire de Supernatural?

Dans la première saison, on avait beaucoup de légendes urbaines - Hook Man et Bloody Mary – alors la première chose que l’on décidait était le monstre. A partir de là, l’histoire se déroulait autour de lui. A cause de ça, la structure des épisodes de la première saison était quasiment toujours identique, au point de devenir ennuyeuse et répétitive. Les gars arrivent en ville, ils rencontrent la fille, vont à la bibliothèque, ils se battent contre le monstre, ils embrassent la fille, et ils se barrent. C’est juste différents monstres à chaque fois.

Quand on en est arrive à la saison 2, [producteur exécutif] Bob Singer et moi avons réalisé que si nous continuions comme ça, on serait morts. On est tombés sur un moyen plus efficace de trouver ces histoires. La première chose qu’on détermine c’est quelle structure n’avons nous pas déjà vu avant ? Est-ce « un après midi de chien » ? Est-ce « un jour sans fin » ? Est-ce Memento ? Quel est le moyen de faire en sorte que notre structure change de manière à nous répéter le moins possible ?

Deuxièmement, quel scénario va mettre les garçons dans la meilleure mauvaise passe émotionnelle ? Mettre les garçons en danger de mort ne semble pas tellement efficace. Vous savez qu’ils vont survivre. Mais les mettre en danger émotionnel fonctionne vraiment car vous pouvez les torturer à mort et la question devient peuvent-ils être sauvés avant d’être complètement ravagés émotionnellement? C’est en fait notre enjeu. Quand on a défini quels seront leurs démons intérieurs, on se demande “quelle créature serait la métaphore parfaite de ça ». Au final les épisodes se sont améliorés.

Comment un épisode comme Hell House, avec un monstre tellement unique, vient au jour ?

C’est un auteur qui écrit en freelance pour nous, Trey Callaway. Il à raconté une anecdote que nous pensions serait un bon épisode pour Supernatural. Lui et ses copains sont tombés sur une cabane abandonnée et ils ont peint l’intérieur à la peinture rouge et avec des chaines.
Ensuite ils sont rentrés chez eux et ont raconté à tout le monde comment ils sont tombés sur cette cabane et que le fantôme d’un serial-killer la hantait.

Comme ça les gosses iraient et vérifieraient l’endroit… et là, la rumeur s’est répandue jusqu’à devenir une légende de la ville. Les gens ont commencé à dire qu’ils avaient vu l’esprit, et là une fille à vu l’esprit et à couru si vite et si effrayée qu’elle est tombée et s’est brisé une jambe.
Et pendant tout ce temps, ces gamins l’avait créé de toute pièce et ça prenait une vie autonome. L’idée que nous avons déroulée est une histoire sur une légende urbaine elle-même et comment elle se répand.

Donc c’est sur comment ces choses prennent vie d’elles même et deviennent ces prophéties qui s’alimentent toutes seules. [L’histoire] traite de ces gens qui inventent ces légendes urbaines et à partir de là, elles prennent littéralement vie du fait qu’on croit en elles.

La dernière étape était, quelle partie de vraie légende pourrait supporter cette idée ? Trey à fait des recherches et dit ‘Tulpas’, ces choses qui prennent vie quand les gens y pensent. Connectez tout ça et c’est un bon exemple de comment quelque chose se développe, souvent avec le monstre en dernier, ces temps ci.

Et vous semblez ne pas avoir peur d’un peu de philosophie ici ou là – les épisodes à thématique religieuse Faith et Houses of the Holy, me viennent à l’esprit.

On joue avec la vie, la mort, le destin, le bien, le mal et donc il semble inévitable de raconter ce genre d’histoires et de faire un peu de philosophie. Je suis en fait plus à l’aise pour cacher ces choses derrière des métaphores. Mon épisode philosophique préféré est Bloodlust.

Ils rencontrent ce chasseur, Gordon (Sterling K. Brown), qui est un tueur de vampire. Si vous changez le mot vampire par n’importe quelle minorité de votre choix, ça devient en fait une plongée plutôt subversive sur le racisme. Gordon est un partisan de la supériorité humaine, et pour lui, un bon membre de cette minorité – vampire - , est un membre mort.
J’aime ce genre parce que vous pouvez dire des choses très subversives et juste les cacher derrière des métaphores.

Dean fait un speech à la fin de l’épisode en disant à Sam ‘Papa nous à élevés pour être racistes. Je ne veux pas l’être, mais je ne peux pas m’en empêcher car je les déteste trop.’ Avoir votre personnage principal prédisposé au racisme n’est pas quelque chose qu’on voit souvent sur la CW. Vous l’enterrez dans des genres et les personnes qui captent le message sont vraiment attentifs.

----------------------------
Jason Davis a été le Manager DVD pour CS Weekly, un éditeur contributeur pour Creative Screenwriting Magazine, et à écrit pour Cinescape.com, msn.com et créé la série TV Studio 13 qui est diffusée sur Lorne Michaels' Burly TV network. Il vit dans le petit espace entre sa bibliothèque qui s’agrandit toujours, ses films et sa musique.
avatar
winsister
Membre d'Honneur des Vodka-Addict Club
Féminin
Age : 42
Messages : 15171
Frère Préféré : Sammy Winchester, Stefan Salvatore
Inscription : 07/01/2008
http://ninou71.unblog.fr/

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 1 Juin - 16:58
Super, un grand merci à toutes les deux pour cette traduction
avatar
Solèna
Première Lame
Première Lame
Féminin
Age : 34
Prénom : Evil Master's Padawan XD
Messages : 9762
Frère Préféré : Sam
Inscription : 23/05/2008

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Dim 1 Juin - 20:01
Mille merci !!

Très intéressant de découvrir les origines de tout ça ....
avatar
Krystel
Poings
Poings
Féminin
Age : 40
Prénom : Christelle
Messages : 12
Frère Préféré : Dean
Inscription : 22/03/2008

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Mer 4 Juin - 0:45
Merci beaucoup pour la traduction !

étant donné que l'anglais et moi (pour l'instant) ça fait 2 !
avatar
sand
Fusil à Pompe
Fusil à Pompe
Féminin
Age : 42
Messages : 852
Frère Préféré : sam
Inscription : 03/05/2007

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Jeu 5 Juin - 6:31
yahoo merci pour l'article et surtout la traduction
avatar
Pascaline59
Fil Barbelé
Fil Barbelé
Féminin
Age : 33
Prénom : pascaline
Messages : 534
Frère Préféré : euh... les 2 mdr
Inscription : 29/05/2007
http://pascalinet.skyblog.com

Re: New interview with Eric Kripke

le Jeu 5 Juin - 12:04
Merci pour la traduction!!!
Voir le sujet précédentRevenir en hautVoir le sujet suivant
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum